Thursday in Golfito, Costa Rica

Today we had a relaxing day and mainly walked around town, which, where we are is mostly one road between the water and the steep hill on the other side. There is a tourist center not far from us, and the helpful woman there told us that it’s good to book tours in advance. She gave us a better understanding of how to get to various wildlife areas around here, and also said they can arrange tours in as much detail as you wish, complete with picnic lunches if you want.

Tomorrow we plan to take the ferry ride to Puerta Jimenez to see what it is like over there. When we make another trip here, we can plan for some other excursions to interesting areas a bit farther from here. Today though, it was nice to walk around and get more of a feel for the area, and just relax a bit.

Of course we had our cameras. When we walked south we saw a few fish markets, and had a very interesting visit to one which resulted is nice conversation and an excellent dinner.

Advertisements

About Kris Cunningham

We live in David, Chiriqui Provence, Republic of Panama! This blog is about some of our experiences in our new country.
This entry was posted in photography, travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Thursday in Golfito, Costa Rica

  1. capt dan says:

    The flags you were curious about are charter boats bragging about how many and which kind of fish they had caught that day. Prospective charter customers can be influenced to do business with them based on how successful they are.

    Like

  2. VisitSiena says:

    Costa Rica .. . there is beautiful 🙂 !!

    Like

  3. I love those palm trees. What kind are they?

    Like

    • In Florida they were called traveler’s palms, I think because a traveler could get water from them. I don’t know what they are called here. I’ve never seen any as tall as those!

      Like

  4. oldsalt1942 says:

    Sorry, Dan, but that’s NOT a sport fishing boat. It’s a long liner. There’s a reel in the front of the pilot house. The fishermen attach short lines with baited hooks to the LONG line which can be a mile long in some cases. The flags, as you can see, are on poles and the are attached to the long line to mark the beggining and end of a line.

    Like

Comments are closed.