Our Cost of Living in Panama

Many people are looking for information on this subject, especially people who are considering a move to this area. Money was a big factor in our move and  of course it is a concern for many others as well, especially with all the economic problems in the US.

We are in the city of David, Chiriqui Province, Republic of Panama. This is only our experience, our information. Other people do things differently, live in other areas, and make other choices so their costs will be different. Keep in mind that many professional Panamanians in our area (eg; teachers, nurses) make $500-600 a month, and many others live on much less than this. If you live like a Panamanian you can have a good life here on less money than in the US.

This is our house. I’m guessing it’s about 1000 square feet, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining room, kitchen, the carport you see here, a laundry room behind it, and a good size patio behind that.

Our HouseOur House

Looking up our street. Looking up our street.

This is our street, a nice quiet middle/upper class neighborhood with mostly professionals – teachers, lawyers, business people, tradesmen, etc. It is on the nicer side of town, 5 minutes from the Pan American Highway and an excellent shopping area. This neighborhood is considered desirable and very expensive by many of the locals.

Our rent is $385/month which includes water and trash pickup. The house was rented unfurnished (which means no appliances).
Electricity last month was $49.45 for 421 kWh which I think is about what we can expect monthly. We do not have air conditioning.
Cable – TV and mid range internet (about 5MB, not the fastest, but not the slowest, and it has worked out just fine) $53.52 / month
Gas for the kitchen – we buy it by the tank. It’s about $65 to buy a tank (you will probably want to have two) and $5.12 to refill it. A tank lasts us about a month. We cook almost everything from scratch and don’t eat out, and have an on demand water heater so we use a fair amount of gas.

Food – last month we spent $339.31 for two adults. This month we have spent $319 and there is a week to go in the month. But, this includes $30 of fish and about $30 of chicken, much of which is still in the freezer, and maybe $50 in bulk items from PriceMart.  So far this month (about 3 weeks) we have spent $68.35 at the produce markets. This includes ALL our fruits and vegetables, and also some eggs, and corn for tortillas  (I have only used a can opener once in the 4 months I have lived here). We have fresh fruit at every meal, and fresh veggies every day.

Food is a big variable. You can get almost everything you are used to in the US, but you will pay US prices and maybe more. You can get produce in the supermarket but you will pay a lot more, and it won’t be the wonderful quality of the markets. If you eat out, prices also vary widely. A Panamanian lunch at the corner hang out is maybe $3 – $4.50. If you go to a restaurant, it could be $6, or $10, or $20+ depending on where you go. Fast food is available but you will pay US prices and more. If you eat like a Panamanian you can keep your costs down a lot, and eat better and healthier food.

Cars – used cars are surprisingly expensive here. Major brands of new cars are readily available.  We paid $5300 for a Hyundai Atos from another expat who was returning to the US. When I first got here I paid $4000 for a 97 Mazda 323. My friend’s mechanic sold me his wife’s car because he said he couldn’t find any other decent cars in my price range ($3-5K). Other people here have told me similar stories about expensive used cars. But, the insurance on the Mazda is about $95/year, and on the Atos (full coverage) about $550 for the year.  Since I’ve been here, gas has ranged from $3.85 – $4.10 a gallon for 91 (which is the lower octane rating here).

If you want to save money, use public transportation. There is an excellent bus system that goes everywhere. A ride is maybe $.25 – $1.00 depending on where you go. Even an all day ride to Panama City is $18. Taxi’s are everywhere and inexpensive, maybe $1 – $3 in town. They charge more for more passengers, or extra packages and baggage, as well as for distance. Bicycles and walking are other very common forms of getting around. we have found biking easier here because drivers are used to sharing the roads with bikes and pedestrians, so they are very considerate.

Alcohol – Local beer is $.48/can (and really good!), less by the case at Pricemart – $.40/can. Rum (2 liters – decent local brand) $10.89 at Pricemart, maybe a couple dollars more in the supermarket. Seco (2 liters – local rum type product) $8.69 at Pricemart, again a bit more at the supermarket. You can get decent box wine, $2/box/liter, and good bottled wine for less than $5/bottle. There is a decent wine selection in the supermarket, and a very nice wine store in the nearby shopping center with a good selection and personal service to help you choose.

Entertainment – we spent $7 for two at the movie theater, evening showing. Another day it was only $5 for both of us. We didn’t buy snacks though, so not sure what they cost.
We found a tennis group, $25 each to join, $5 monthly dues. Tennis balls however are $8/can.  If I understand correctly, golf is also available at the same location for $30/month.
We bought bicycles, $265 each for good bikes, 21 gears, shocks in the front. (I don’t know how this compares to the US).

Health Care – a visit to the doctor will cost $20 – $40 basic charge. A visit is as much time as you need.  A visit to the dentist is maybe $30 for a cleaning or filling, more for other procedures. I am getting a crown for $250. I have found health care here much more affordable and the quality excellent. I was a nurse in the US, and I am very happy and thankful to be here. There are various options for health insurance but this is not a subject I’m qualified to talk about. We have decided to pay as we go.

>Also, keep in mind that that jubilado or pensionado discounts lower costs of many things even further, for those who qualify. More info HERE

Moving expenses – this is a one time expense, but people are understandably curious so I will give you my $.02 worth. This expense can also vary greatly. If you want to save money, move as little as possible. Come down here with whatever you can bring in suitcases. It’s cheaper to buy what you need here than move it. Do not bring a car. From what I understand it’s complicated and expensive, and older cars cost more than newer cars to import. If you want to move stuff that involves shipping, expect to pay thousands. If you want to move the entire household of stuff, you can rent a container so with enough money it is possible.

Getting settled – another one time expense. For us, I saw this unfurnished house that I really wanted, so I had to do some major shopping for appliances, beds, dishes, everything! But, this is not as difficult as it sounds. There is a large variety of options. You can get a little $100 stove, or a $900 stove with all the bells and whistles. I think decent mid range appliances are comparable to what they cost in the US, and you will see many familiar brands. I lived in Florida before, land of wealthy people where you can furnish your house with great second hand stuff. Here in Panama though, there is little used furniture and it’s expensive. New furniture is available all over town but it costs probably as much as new furniture in the US, though that is hard for me to say since I never bought new furniture. Or, it’s also possible to rent a furnished place. Some have everything down to the spoons and towels.

Whew! I think I have covered all the basics. Thanks for hanging in there to the end. If you see incorrect information, have suggestions, questions, or anything else please leave me a comment!

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About Kris Cunningham

We live in David, Chiriqui Provence, Republic of Panama! This blog is about some of our experiences in our new country.
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70 Responses to Our Cost of Living in Panama

  1. Whew! Great. Hey, Kris, what about cell phone?

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    • Kris says:

      Thanks! I bought a cheap phone for around $20 and prepay for time ($.09/minute) When it gets low on time I go put some more money on it. You can get iPhones and other smart phones – very common here but I don’t know what they cost.

      Like

    • Zak says:

      Hi, just wanted to ask you what a qualified nurse from the Uk or USA would earn in panama?

      Like

  2. Anonymous says:

    Great post. I’ve always wondered about costs…especially house rentals. It’s funny how expensive some items are, though….used cars, tennis balls etc. Loved the post. Keep up the good work.

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    • Kris says:

      In this area house rentals can be $100 (wouldn’t want to live there) to $1500? (large luxury mansion with maid’s house). Ours is an example of what we think is a very comfortable house and neighborhood which I’m happy to have at an affordable price (affordable for us, not for most locals) Someone told me they want fewer cars on the road so that’s why prices are high (the government influences things somehow), and public transportation is so good. Tennis balls? I dunno, supply and demand, I suppose.

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  3. Great job! Much of what you said is true here in Ecuador as well – especially the part about food costs. If one wants to go to the city and get canned goods and prepared foods, they can pay as much as we did in the United States, but if one eats like an Ecuadoriano, they will eat much better and spend far less. Beside, going to the mercado is one of the highlights of our week.

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    • Kris says:

      Thank you 🙂 I just told our neighborhood produce guy today that his store is my very favorite, and it’s true! I’m so spoiled by all the produce here.

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  4. allison says:

    Great post. Thanks for the openness and honesty. Internet and food is what usually seems to run the highest for most expats, it seems. And also if in Panama City, the A/C running all the time can cause electric bills to skyrocket! This is why I am leaning towards the mountains 🙂 but time will tell. I could change my mind tomorrow, again.

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    • Kris says:

      Come spend some time in various places and see what feels right to you. For me both Panama City and David are more comfortable than Florida. I wouldn’t want to be without a/c in FL. But if you do use a/c here your bills will go up. I think electricity is as much as the US, if not more. Food? This is much less than we spent in the US where it wasn’t unusual at all to spend $150/week. We also spent twice as much on TV/internet. But, if you are talking about the greatest percentage of our budget now, yes, food and rent, and then internet. and then some optional things like Spanish lessons and our tennis coach.

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  5. Great information! Thank you for taking the time to post. Very helpful. 🙂

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    • Kris says:

      Thanks! glad you found it useful.

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      • cliff says:

        hi kriss im cliff from jordan i would come to panam i have friend there , i need some answerrse for them, plz
        im greek and lebanese food cook i do shawarma and kebabs homo etc,, so how much in dollar u think that i can make a month, also how is life caost and is the economy is good? and where is panama in economic feild between souyh american countries,? i wish u give me the anser in text on my face account as cliff kalaf, coz i dont know how to back to this page, thanks v much criss..

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  6. indacampo says:

    Hi Kris:

    If any of your readers are interested I posted our living expenses after living in our area after we lived here for five months last October. They can find it here: http://indacampo.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/what-does-it-cost-to-live-in-panama/

    Probably the main differences with us is that I included our Spanish lessons (still doing them twice a week) and we have health and dental insurance from Canada (my hubby was a federal government employee and we have comprehensive insurance with his pension). We’ve never had to use it but it covers the basics as well as catastrophic and repatriation so we kept the plan.

    We also own our home and an SUV that we bought used. I estimated all our costs on the high side to keep it honest. Gas prices go up and down and so does our grocery bill but I’m also finding that we get by more and more without Norte Americano food. Like you we hardly ever open a can and eat a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables. We live in a fishing community so we usually have fish in the freezer or fresh from someone who has extra. I don’t use very much prepackaged food and I bake at least once or twice a week.

    Thanks for posting this. I’m enjoying see how your area compares to mine!

    KA

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    • Kris says:

      and I was interested to read yours! It seems our basic costs aren’t too much different except for the house. I also have Spanish lessons and tennis lessons but figured these were optional and didn’t include them with the basic living expenses.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Loved the link. Interesting to see all the different averages. Definitely gives us a better idea of what we are looking at.

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      • Kris says:

        Good, glad if it was helpful. I’ll probably post other such reports periodically because it’s a very important subject for people thinking about living here!

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  7. I’m laughing about your can opener comment. The other day, I bought a can of cherries to make a cherry pie…the first can of anything I ever bought in over 2 years here in Nicaragua. I couldn’t find a can opener anywhere and we had to resort to using the Swiss Army knife to open it. Two weeks ago, a young local friend of ours stopped by to visit. Our local visitors always bring us some little food treat..usually fruit, but Paulino brought us canned tomato soup and chicken noodle soup. “Where in the world did you find this?” I asked Paulino. He told us that missionaries brought the canned food to his church, but no one knew what to do with gringo food, so he brought it to our house. LOL Thanks for your cost of living analysis. I am always curious to know how much expats pay for things in different countries. Our electricity is high, too. We average about $50 a mo. with no air conditioning. I only wish that when the electricity goes out..almost daily..that they’d give us a discount. Sometimes I don’t think they read the meter, only make an average of last month’s bill.

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    • Kris says:

      I wonder if the missionaries know how not useful their food donations are. I bought a can opener when I set up the kitchen because of course, you have to have one, right?
      Good luck with the electricity. That has to be annoying especially when you’re paying a good amount for it. At least here ours is quite reliable.

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  8. Annelised says:

    Why such a big difference in car insurances?

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  9. Pingback: More Panama Cost of Living Information | In Da Campo

  10. patriciamoed says:

    Thanks for the insights and tips! The cost of living is great there!

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  11. oldsalt1942 says:

    Like yourselves, I live in a middle class neighborhood at a fraction of what it cost me in Fort Lauderdale. I rent a small, completely furnished house for $175/month, and you’ve seen it. Nothing fancy, but quite comfortable. My electric bill fluctuates depending on the time of the year. It’s rather high right now. It’s the dry season and it IS HOT down here “on the flat,” and I’m using the a/c for a few hours during the hottest part of the day. Even so, I’m only paying about $30 and change for the month. In the rainy season I’ve paid as low as $8 and change. In Lauderdale my part of the rent for a 2/2 duplex was $600/month and the electric bill was ALWAYS at least $125!

    Transportation is also a real value, and you’re right about the buses. You can get pretty much anywhere you want to go in this country on public transportation. The cheapest fare around David is 35 cents. From my place in Boqueron to the central terminal in David the cost, after the “Jubilado” (Old Farts) discount is 65 cents. Another 35 cents takes me to Plaza Terronal where the big El Rey supermarket is. So, for $2 round-trip (about 40 miles) it’s a bargain. It would be absolutely impossible to make the trip in your car for that. And we’re NOT talking chicken buses here, either, folks. Most of the buses are nearly new Toyota Coasters. Thirty seats and air conditioned, too. Mostly. The only converted school buses are the ones that run up to Boquete.

    I get what is the “average” Social Security check each month. In the States that means I’d have to have a job as a greeter at Squalmart or as a bag boy at Publix if they’d hire me. Here, on the other hand, I have a comfortable life with wonderful neighbors and at the end of each month I have more money than I started with.

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    • Kris says:

      Yep! That’s a big reason many of us are here, a comfortable life for much less. The wonderful neighbors are a wonderful bonus.
      And, not only are the buses comfortable, there is an attendant to help you off and on, and deal with excess packages, and anything else he can do to help. You don’t find that in the US.
      Squalmart. LOL We’ve all seen the seniors out working, and thankful that Squalmart and Publix will give them a job because they need the money to survive.

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      • oldsalt1942 says:

        To be fair, not all of the people working as greeters and baggers are doing it for the money, though I suspect the majority are. There are a lot of retired people who just don’t want to sit around the house and acquire a patina of mold, and going to a part time job gives them purpose in their lives. You were a nurse, I think. Lots of hospitals depend on retirees who volunteer their time, and shelters feeding the homeless see a lot of retired volunteers, too. And then there are others, like us, who move on to another adventure.

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      • Kris says:

        You’re right. We always chatted with the store employees and the majority of them who talked with us on this subject needed the money. Otherwise they could taken some of the many volunteer opportunities around town. Yes, I was a nurse, and I also encountered many volunteers in the school system (and I was one myself). I think with all the retirees in FL, there are lots of volunteers who work in a great variety of positions and make very valuable contributions to their communities.

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  12. Pingback: Our Cost of Living in Panama – April | The Panama Adventure

  13. Abigayle says:

    How did you find your home to rent in Panama? Did you find it before moving or after getting there and familiar with the area. I’m thinking of retiring there and am trying to collect as much data as I can to prepare for the next trip.

    Great info & thanks for sharing!

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  14. Pingback: Re visiting the Cost of Living in David, Panama – FindingMySelfinPanama

  15. Anonymous says:

    hi Cris, we are from Italy and we are thinking to move in Panama as you know now it is very difficult to live in Italy…. can you give us some more infos about David and Boquete ? we are me, my husband and two sons of 17 and 10 years old. bye Raffaella

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    • Kris says:

      Italy! What a wonderful place. I visited once and loved it, so much to experience, such wonderful people. I’m sure it’s expensive though. I’m not sure what information you need about David and Boquete. Check my website – http://thepanamaadventure.com/links You may find the first two links very useful. If I can answer specific questions write me at info (at) thePanamaAdventure (dot) com. We are retired though, and you will be coming with children. I hope you can find people in the forums that have better answers for you and your situation.

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      • tombseekers says:

        I’ve noticed a LOT of families with school-age children moving here. Many go to virtual school or home schooling but many go to the many choices here in Boquete. As a newly retired teacher from Florida, I believe they have made a great choice moving their kids o Panama.

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  16. Pingback: Our Cost of Living in Panama – June 2013 | The Panama Adventure

  17. Dave Brown says:

    Very well explained and all your information is helping me decide. I’m am planning on a retirement spot out of the USA. I am 45 single and plan on retiring at 50. I currently live in Atlanta, Ga. Just tired of the fast paced life here. My main focus is the temperature. I love the 40%’s in winter but hate the 90%’s in the summer. What is the weather like there where you live? Thanks again for a very informative description.

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    • Kris says:

      A nice thing about Panama is you have choices for weather. You probably won’t like it at sea level, too hot and humid. But, up in the mountains it’s quite a bit cooler. A lot of people love Boquete and Volcan in this part of Panama because of the cooler weather. There are other places in eastern Panama like El Valle which are also higher and cooler. A friend in Volcan told us it occasionally gets down in the 40’s there, but generally it’s 60’s and 70’s.

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  18. Pingback: Our Cost of Living in Panama – July 2013 | The Panama Adventure

  19. Casey says:

    Great overview of costs. Of course, individual situations vary greatly. In comparison to Costa Rica where we live it looks like cars are actually cheaper there, gas is about $1.50/gal. cheaper there, eating out about the same, rents roughly the same, and your avg. KWh rate is half of ours. Panama’s residency program is definitely much better than CR’s. We visited once, David, Boquete, Volcan and it seems that RE prices are higher than here and there’s just not much choice since Panama has so few mountainous areas. Thanks for the article!

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    • Kris says:

      Thanks for the comment 🙂 We haven’t been to Costa Rica and are looking forward to the opportunity to see the country. I don’t know much about cost comparisons though, except to say my neighbors told me that Costa Ricans are moving to Panama because of costs. Real estate is higher in Boquete because of the large expat influx, but maybe other areas are more affordable?
      I’m glad you stopped by here, so now I have the link to your blog. It looks really interesting and I’m looking forward to exploring it!

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  20. Jehanne "Jay" says:

    Hello Kris! I am relocating to Dolega next year with my family. Where are you taking tennis lessons, and around how much? I will bring my own balls. LOL!!

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    • Kris says:

      Hello, soon to be neighbor! There is a tennis club that meets a Fertica, the fertilizer business down the road from PriceMart. I met our teacher through the club. He has an excellent reputation and we were very happy with him. I think it was $20/hour, if I remember. Unfortunately my knee starting giving me trouble every time I played, so I decided I’d better stop. I’m still in touch with the leader of the club though so get in touch when you get here and I’ll give you his info, and the info of our teacher. The leader speaks English but the teacher only a little, mostly “MOVE YOUR FEET!” LOL If you have room to bring balls that’s good because they are quite a bit more expensive here.

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  21. robyncole says:

    Excellent post! And am glad you like my blog http://www.thirdworldwife.com. Soon I will post an article on what it costs to live in Boquete. Rents are a bit more expensive up here on the hill and so are restaurant costs. I’ll put my head together with new neighbor Holly Carter and we’ll come up with something!

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    • I know rents are higher up there. I don’t know about restaurants since we rarely eat out. Down here I think there are a variety of prices depending on where you go. It will be interesting to see how your numbers come out!

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  22. I am finding your blog so helpful with the almost guarantee I will be moving to Panama in February – about the health care and dental – anyone can go or do you need something specific before you can visit a doctor?

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  23. Luis says:

    I was born and raised in Panama, moved to South Florida in 2008, I’m 26. All that you say is true, its only expensive when is luxury. Cellphone contracts in Panama don’t have unlimited talking time like in here. The technology keeps up with the inventions from the US and sometimes could be not affordable for the average panamanian. The education is superior than in the US, less expensive as well, there’s many scholarships for excellent graded students that cover from elementary to college, from food, to books, transportation etc,. The transportation is simple and of fast access, the food is pretty much organic, an easy example is the ice cream itself, milk, eggs and all of that. Health is pretty affordable. I’m going back to Panama for all this reasons and more

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    • Education is better and less expensive too? From what I hear from teachers in the US, I’m not surprise to hear this. Yes, I am finding a lot of things to like about Panama. I hope your time in Florida is good, and I can understand why you want to return to Panama. Thanks for stopping by my blog and writing a comment 🙂

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  24. Dee says:

    Kris, your blog was so interesting. We are planning on moving there hopefully within the year or so. We have been checking places in David also. What is the weather like in david? Also how far to any beaches, we like to walk the beach.. Thanks

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    • Thanks 🙂 Glad you enjoy the blog. You can’t walk to the beach from David. it’s maybe 45 minutes by car to La Barqueta, and longer to Las Lajas (maybe 1 1/4-1/2 hr) but it’s really beautiful. The weather in David is warm, low 70’s at night and upper 80’s in the day, maybe 90’s in the dry season. You might also check the Azeuro Penninsula. Pedasi is a small town but the beaches are very close. It’s going to be hot by most people’s standards anywhere at sea level though, but there is cooler weather in the mountains and at higher elevations. There are many options here so it depends on where you will be happiest. Come visit and see what feels right to you!

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  25. Rainee says:

    That was really interesting. Our cost of living in Western Australia is at least 5 times more than what you describe. I hope you enjoy the experience 🙂

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  26. Zak says:

    Hi, thank you for the information. Just wanted to ask if there is any information on pay for nurses from the uk or USA.

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    • I don’t know, but I would guess a nurse here makes maybe $500-700/month judging on what I have heard for salaries for other professionals. But also, I doubt you could get permission to work here unless you have some special credentials for something they can’t fill from within.

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  27. Christine says:

    Hello David,

    I went to your website since I was searching for info. on moving to Panama and I must say I like your honesty. My husband and I presently live in Cabarete Dominican Republic and we were thinking of moving elsewhere. It has become increasingly dangerous for gringos living here, we are targets here and have no recourse. We were wondering how safe it is to live in Pedasi(we like to be near the beach). Also, he is a private chef working out of villas here as well as a private hairstylist. I have worked in various hospitals and centres in geriatrics, mental illness etc. We were wondering what kind of job oppurtunities are there in Pedasi(working independently) for us. Also, we would like to know what the cost of living is like there i.e renting a 1-2 bedroom apt. or house, how much money do we need to get by monthly? We do not need a lavish place, just comfie and clean. I would greatly appreciate any info. you have to share with us.

    Thanks an have a great day,

    christine

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  28. Trev Page says:

    Kris, that’s a really cute house you’re in! Any idea of the cost to buy something like that in David as opposed to renting? Are you on a long-term lease? Renting seems like a good way to go to maximize our retirement portfolio instead of blowing a bunch of it on a house that might not appreciate in value or be difficult to sell if we changed our minds.

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    • I think a house like ours would sell for around $85-90K. We’re renting month to month, unfurnished. Something furnished would be a bit more. I think David is growing and prices are appreciating so if the right opportunity came along we would seriously consider it. It is highly recommended that you rent for at least a year though until you know for sure this will work for you, you know the area, and you have some local friends for advice.

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      • Trev Page says:

        Yes, I’ve heard the same thing from many others and it would be in our plans. I’ve heard that selling homes there can be a time-consuming process so we wouldn’t want to make a mistake. We’d have no problem selling our place here in about 3 or 4 days. The market in Toronto is white-hot.

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        • I think like anywhere, it depends on the home. Some expats have very expensive homes with a limited pool of potential buyers and may be overly optimistic about what they are worth.
          Hopefully the Toronto market is this good when you’re ready to sell.

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  29. nita says:

    WE are planning a trip (April 25-May 3) to Panama to look for a place to retire , We are flying into Panama City and renting a car. We are staying near Coronado, and wanting to visit different towns, also we are coming as far a David, We will be in Panama about 9 days. I love the beach but I think the mountains would be a little cooler and we could drive to the beach, I don’t think we will have time to go to the Caribbean side which I may prefer, All this and I have to convince my husband LOL I am so excited and love your blog I think it may be more realistic that some of the other articles we’ve read Oh I wrote all this to ask you for any recomendations .
    thanks

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    • Hi and thanks for visiting my blog 🙂
      Not knowing you and what kind of living you prefer – and me not knowing all areas of Panama very well – you might visit the Pedasi area. http://indacampo.wordpress.com/ and http://mcmoller.wordpress.com/ are a couple bloggers who live there. It’s a small town but the beaches are beautiful. You’re visiting Coronado (which I know very little about myself), and you’ll be in David so you can check the beaches in this area. I love Boca Chica, not exactly a beach place but really beautiful, and Las Lajas is my favorite beach around here. Bocas del Toro is probably the only place to consider living on the Caribbean side – really beautiful but for me it’s too far from shopping, health care, etc. https://www.facebook.com/groups/200167863435003/ is a Facebook group for folks there. The rest of the Caribbean side east of Chiriqui Grande is mostly undeveloped and Indian comarca. http://www.panamaforreal.com/ Another site you may find helpful.
      What do you have to convince your husband of? visiting? living here? You’re doing the best thing – visit and see how it feels to you. That will tell you a lot. We should be around during your travel dates so send me a note if you want to get together for coffee or something 🙂

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      • nita says:

        HI, Kris

        Thanks for answering me so quickly..
        We want to live very simply, eat fresh veggies, fruit, my parents were missionaries and I was born in Northern Bolivia and the boarder of Brazil. but have lived in the us since I was 8, my mom died of cancer.

        My husband is a mountain man very mountain, LOL any way I;m trying to get away from all the drama with our kids and Eds a work a holic, so want to slow down, live simply in a place not to hot,,, or expensive,,, and enjoy life. If we do decide we want to move to Panama we will want to rent for awhile… Can’t wait to come

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