Iguanas in the Yard, and other interesting things

Tossing kitchen scraps in the yard can be interesting. We have been tossing them outside of the office window so we can peek at the visitors. The iguanas are usually very shy. We have spotted them but they always take off if they spot us. Today I managed to get some video through the window before he saw me. Apparently they really like papaya peels!

There have actually been two iguanas in the yard today. The bigger one is more skittish.

iguana11

The smaller one is darker, and seems a little less likely to run off though he also remains very aware of his surroundings. Here he is with a papaya peel in his mouth.

iguana21

This is an owl butterfly enjoying some watermelon peels. Photo by Joel.

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I am very excited about this photo! These cocaleca, or wood rails are so shy and hard to photograph. This is the first decent photo I’ve taken since I’ve been here.

cocoleca

These are the birds that make the amazing sounds. The first night I heard them I took a video and I still love listening to them. 

And,  a couple other things…

I spotted this interesting tree in town. It had green balls the size of small bowling balls! Does anyone know what it is?

tree

The other night had a really beautiful sunset.

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This concludes the odds and ends I have on my desk at the moment, but I’m sure there will be more!

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About Kris Cunningham

We live in David, Chiriqui Provence, Republic of Panama! This blog is about some of our experiences in our new country.
This entry was posted in bird watching, expat, expatriate, Panama, photography, sunsets, wildlife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Iguanas in the Yard, and other interesting things

  1. the iguanas are beauties! the woodrail – wow, you’re stealth is paying off!
    the green-ball tree is a calabash, and people often use the dried husks as containers.. for water, scoops.. my friend luchy makes beautiful hanging light fixtures from them!
    nice post, amiga!

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    • kristc99 says:

      Thanks for the tree info. I thought they looked too hard to eat but maybe useful for other things. And the wood rail, how about that! I’ve found them about impossible to sneak up on, and this one was gone in a flash as soon as it heard the camera click.

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  2. Roger says:

    The tree is called Calabaza or Totumo Tree. It is not a fruit to be eaten. Native panamanians and farmers (campesinos) dried the fruit and the shell harden hard and it is used as a tool to keep water, to drink water or as a dish, etc.

    Look in this link for more information http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crescentia_cujete

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    • kristc99 says:

      Thank you so much! It was so interesting I hollered STOP and made Joel pull over so I could look at it. I’m happy to know more about it. And, now I also have new vocabulary words to look up 😀

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  3. Outstanding pictures and commentary! It is so fascinating to see and hear the new animals we encounter in our new homes!

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  4. indacampo says:

    Did you notice that the fruit appears to grow on the trunk?

    The calabaza/calabash fruit make bowls and cups depending on what size they are. A design can be scratched into the hollowed out green fruit and then dried. When it dries it turns a brown or tan color. The 2011 Queen of the Carreta Festival here gave out lovely little cups with her name on them instead of the sweets that they usually hand out.

    There is also calabaza/calabash trees in Nicaragua. When we were there in 2011 we asked someone about them and he said that the fruit inside used to be made into a coffee type drink. It is very labor intensive to make and it’s not used much anymore.

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  5. Kris says:

    I didn’t see fruit on the trunk, but I was standing in the street, husband in the car so it was one of those snap and run things. But, now that you mention it, in the photo the fruit does appear to be coming out of the branches or trunks. There are so many cool new things around here!

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  6. D. Quixote says:

    http://folklore.panamatipico.com/articulo.php?articulo=318
    http://mensual.prensa.com/mensual/contenido/2010/05/09/hoy/nacionales/2182218.asp
    Fresh eyes on what take for granted or find common. Plastic has destroyed this skill even if there is a festival celebrating it; see last article.
    I hope that trend does not keep on going, as it is no one under forty know what to do with calabazas anymore. This might be an example/warning: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/02/08/171497684/gastro-nomics-hunting-for-a-good-meal-in-puerto-rico

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    • Kris says:

      I love it every time you visit my blog and leave so much useful information. Thank you once again! And that last article is scary. I certainly hope that doesn’t happen here. You wouldn’t think it would make economic sense to move food such distances but apparently it does. And, of course, it’s always about the money.

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      • D. Quijote says:

        Happy to add depth to your experience. BTW, could you change the word province in your blog. And, I should add, after reading what I wrote I feel apologetic about my poor writing, inexcusable. And happy that you have chosen my province -I am 4 (cuatro)- as the place to live.

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      • Kris says:

        You are from here?! I have been meaning to ask and learn more about you since you have taught me so much about this area.
        Change province? To what? or just remove it? I’ve been wondering because in the US it’s called Chiriqui Province, but here people seem to call it just Chiriqui.
        Please don’t apologize for your writing. I understood you without a problem and I’m happy that you leave me comments 🙂

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      • D. Quijote says:

        Yeah, chiricano born and bred!
        This is what I meant, a typo I am sure: “We live in David, Chiriqui Provence, Republic of Panama!” It’s written provence. Know about me? Outside the blog? e-mail? I am sure there is a way but my technology familiarity is minimal.

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      • D. Quijote says:

        Hi,
        Enjoying beautiful places (I have longed to see Bryce and Zion) while I am getting ready to visit my birth place. I guess there won’t be a chance to meet although I never received an email from you; I don’t know if you can access personal emails from the people who write to your blog.
        Safe traveling

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      • Kris says:

        I hope you get a chance to visit southern Utah someday. It’s really amazing! Are you coming back to Chiriqui? I’d love to meet you if we can work it out. I wrote to the hotmail address that it gives me when you comment. Or, you can try writing me at MsKris941 (at) gmail (dot) com

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